Conditions Treated

Renee – Fibromyalgia


Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is a common syndrome in which a person has long-term, body-wide pain and tenderness in the joints, muscles, tendons, and other soft tissues. Fibromyalgia has also been linked to fatigue, sleep problems, headaches, depression, and anxiety. The underlying cause is so far not accepted as understood or known, but it is most seen in women between the ages of 20 and 50.

Pain is the main symptom of Fibromyalgia and it may be moderate to severe. Painful areas are called tender points. Tender points are found in the soft tissue on the back of the neck, shoulders, chest, lower back, hips, shins, elbows, and knees. The pain then spreads out from these areas. The joints are not affected, although the pain may feel like it is coming from the joints. People with fibromyalgia tend to wake up with body aches and stiffness. For some patients, pain improves during the day and gets worse at night. Some patients have pain all day long. Pain may get worse with activity, cold or damp weather, anxiety, and stress. Fatigue, depressed mood, and sleep problems are seen in almost all patients with fibromyalgia. Many say that they can’t get to sleep or stay asleep, and they feel tired when they wake up.

Fibromyalgia is a long-term disorder. Sometimes, the symptoms improve. Other times, the pain may get worse and continue for months or years.


Colin – Increased Focus and Mental Clarity



Kim – Migraines


Migraines and Chronic Headaches

A migraine headache can cause intense throbbing or pulsing in one area of the head and is commonly accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and extreme sensitivity to light and sound. Migraine attacks commonly cause significant pain for hours to days and be so severe that all you can think about is finding a dark, quiet place to lie down.

Some migraines are preceded or accompanied by sensory warning symptoms (called an aura), such as flashes of light, blind spots or tingling in your arm or leg.

If you have headaches multiple times per week, you may be experiencing a variety of head pain known as chronic daily headaches. The incessant nature of chronic daily headaches makes them among the most disabling headaches. The brain itself is not sensitive to pain, because it lacks pain receptors. However, several areas of the head and neck do have nociceptors, and can thus sense pain. These include the extracranial arteries, large veins, cranial and spinal nerves, head and neck muscles and the meninges.

Headache often results from traction to or irritation of the meninges and blood vessels. The nociceptors may also be stimulated by other factors than head trauma or tumors and cause headaches. Some of these include stress, dilated blood vessels and muscular tension. Once stimulated, a nociceptor sends a message up the length of the nerve fiber to the nerve cells in the brain, signaling that a part of the body hurts.

The most common types of headache are the “primary headache disorders”, such as tension-type headache and migraine. They have typical features; migraine, for example, tends to be pulsating in character, affecting one side of the head, associated with nausea, disabling in severity, and usually lasts between 3 hours and 3 days. Rarer primary headache disorders are trigeminal neuralgia (a shooting face pain), cluster headache (severe pains that occur together in bouts), and hemicrania continua (a continuous headache on one side of the head), Headaches may be caused by problems elsewhere in the head or neck. Some of these are not harmful, such as cervicogenic headache (pain arising from the neck muscles).


Melissa – Shooting Pain neck and arm (sleep and migraine relief too)


Shooting Pain/Nerve Root Impingement

Nerve root impingement is due to foraminal stenosis (a closing of a spinal nerves’ exit way from the spinal column), a form of spinal stenosis. Foraminal stenosis may be caused by a herniated disc, bulging disc, bone spur, facet joint hypertrophy, or spinal subluxation (misalignment).

Often a herniated disc by itself does not cause pain. Pain occurs when the membrane on the outside of the spinal cord or spinal nerves is irritated. Loss of function, such as weakness or altered sensation, can be caused by pressure from the herniated disc on the nerve roots or spinal cord. Pain or numbness may occur in the area of the body to which the nerve travels like the shoulders or buttock or even past the knee to the feet. The symptoms occur along the path of the nerve affected, usually the arms or legs.

 


Khumura – Numbness in legs, menstrual issues (energy and sleep improvements)


Numbness

Numbness and tingling are abnormal sensations that can occur anywhere in your body, but are often felt in your fingers, hands, feet, arms, or legs. Numbness describes a loss of sensation or feeling in a part of your body. Numbness is usually caused by irritation or compression of a branch of a nerve in the periphery of your body. Diseases affecting the peripheral nerves, such as diabetes, also can cause numbness.

There are many possible causes including, but not limited to, injuring a nerve (a neck injury may cause you to feel numbness anywhere along your arm or hand, while a low back injury can cause numbness or tingling down the back of your leg), pressure on the nerves of the spine, such as from a herniated disk or spinal subluxation, pressure on peripheral nerves from enlarged blood vessels, tumors, scar tissue, or infection.

Menstrual Cramps

Menstrual cramps (dysmenorrhea) are dull, throbbing or cramping pains in the lower abdomen. Menstrual pain is often used synonymously with menstrual cramps, but the latter may also refer to menstrual uterine contractions, which are generally of higher strength, duration and frequency than in the rest of the menstrual cycle.

Dysmenorrhea can feature different kinds of pain, including sharp, throbbing, dull, nauseating, burning, or shooting pain. Dysmenorrhea may precede menstruation by several days or may accompany it, and it usually subsides as menstruation tapers off.

Menstrual cramps may be caused by identifiable problems, such as endometriosis or uterine fibroids. Treating the underlying cause is key to reducing the pain.

Symptoms often co-occurring with menstrual pain include nausea and vomiting, diarrhea or constipation, headache, dizziness, disorientation, hypersensitivity to sound, light, smell and touch, fainting, and fatigue. Symptoms of dysmenorrhea often begin immediately following ovulation and can last until the end of menstruation. This is because dysmenorrhea is often associated with changes in hormonal levels in the body that occur with ovulation.

Sleep Disorders-Insomnia

Insomnia is a symptom of either difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep (or both). Many causes exist and can include physical intrusions, psychological issues, chemical changes and side effects from medication, hormonal changes, or just poor habits. The prevalence of insomnia ranges between 20-30% of adults who at one point in their lives will experience this symptom. Symptoms include difficulty falling asleep, difficulty staying asleep, early morning awakening, and waking up feeling not refreshed.

Insomnia can be classified as transient, acute, or chronic.

  1. Transient insomnia lasts for less than a week. It can be caused by another disorder, by changes in the sleep environment, by the timing of sleep, severe depression, or by stress. Its consequences – sleepiness and impaired psychomotor performance – are similar to those of sleep deprivation.
  2. Acute insomnia is the inability to consistently sleep well for a period of less than a month. Insomnia is present when there is difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep or when the sleep that is obtained is non-refreshing or of poor quality. These problems occur despite adequate opportunity and circumstances for sleep and they must result in problems with daytime function.
  3. Chronic insomnia lasts for longer than a month. It can be caused by another disorder, or it can be a primary disorder. People with high levels of stress hormones or shifts in the levels of cytokines are more likely to have Chronic insomnia. Its effects can vary according to its causes. They might include muscular fatigue, hallucinations, and/or mental fatigue.